Things To Do In Order To Fight Cancer (5)

Things To Do In Order To Fight Cancer

There are 4 stages of ovarian cancer. In stage I the cancer is confined to one or both ovaries. In stage II it has spread outside of the ovaries to the uterus or fallopian tubes. In Stage III the cancer has spread outside of the pelvic area but still within the abdomen. Stage IV means the cancer has started to spread throughout the body.

All people who have had cancer should understand that it can always come back bigger, meaner and stronger. You have to deal with this fear now so that you are better prepared if in fact the cancer does return. Do not assume that you will be ready to deal with it the second time just because you dealt with it the first time. Prepare yourself accordingly.

The one big benefit from having survived cancer is that you now know what the signs and symptoms of the disease are, so make sure you’re fully aware of any changes in your life so that you can catch it in time. If you have any symptoms of the cancer returning rush to get help while you are still able.

If you find blood in your urine or stool, it is very important that you see a doctor right away. Blood in the urine could indicate bladder cancer while blood in your stool could be a sign of colon or rectal cancer. Both of these cancers have higher survival rates when treated in its early stages.

There’s really nothing like boredom to bring your spirits down as you’re fighting through your cancer, so make sure that you’re always attempting to spice things up. Being bored will bring on those gloomy thoughts and throw you into a funk. Being entertained, on the other hand, reminds you of how fun being alive is.

Be mindful of your exposure to BPA. This synthetic estrogen is often found in canned goods, water bottles and other items. Research has shown that BPA has the potential to cause cancer, so try to eat more frozen foods and look for water bottles that are labeled as BPA free.

Open up to others with cancer. You may feel that your friends and family, who have never had cancer, may not understand what you are going through. There are many support groups for those who have cancer or have survived cancer. There are also online message boards and forums where people speak candidly.

Make sure that you are up-to-date on your immunizations. Viral infections can have an impact on certain types of cancer so ask your doctor whether you have received all the necessary immunizations. In particular find out whether you have the Hepatitis B and HPV immunizations; these can help prevent liver cancer and cervical cancer.

Stage I is the best case scenario. The cancer is still confined to the ovaries, making surgery alone a more successful option. When it goes into stage II, a hysterectomy is often necessary to make sure all of the cancer was removed. Stages III and IV are more likely to require chemotherapy.